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Thread: 'The Fields of Anfield Road': What does this song mean to you?

  1. #31  
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    Inspired me to write this a few weeks ago (not set to the tune ) just in a poetic sense....


    The Glorious Fields of Anfield Road

    All round the fields of Anfield Road, 96 supporters will sadly never again go.
    As they now look down on their beloved Anfield from the warmth of Heavens
    glow.
    And to some of those younger fans, the Anfield stadium was their new shrine.
    One such kopite was just a 10 year old boy, taken away well before his time.


    All round the fields of Anfield Road, fans come together for every Liverpool game.
    Fans of every club in the country on match day, you’ll find will do exactly the same.
    But Anfield will always be set apart, as so much raw emotion it now has to bring.
    As our home is now 96 voices short, no matter how loud the Spion Kop may sing.


    All round the fields of Anfield Road, I first went there as a young lad in sixty eight.
    The Kop immediately owned my heart, and for my next game I could hardly wait.
    Anfield was such a magical place, not just the ground but every surrounding street.
    But those streets are now tinged with a lasting sadness and to me no longer a treat.


    All round the fields of Anfield Road today I walk, and recall memories old and new.
    I look at the most recent flowers and messages, and I add my own message too.
    Some of those beautiful flowers may be starting to wilt, slowly dying they may be.
    Soon the wind will take those dying petals away and I realise I’m so lucky to be free.


    All round the fields of Anfield Road, we’ll remember all of those that died in our name.
    They’ll be treasured as much as any of our legends, no matter how great was their fame.
    Whatever the future has in store for us, be it more success or heavy burdens to unload.
    The victims of Hillsborough will never be forgotten round the glorious fields of Anfield Road.
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    i was recently in tenerife and every night we went to a irish bar called temples bar. there was a irishman there who played live music and he would often play Fields of Athenry. there i was singing aloud ( always drunk at the time he played this song) to feilds of anfield road. every time he would play it he would tell the crowd 'great the scouser is here to ruin the song'
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  3. #33  
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    Liverpool had no real southern irish connection till the 1970s. When we started winning.

    To link Liverpool to Ireland via this song is quite far fetched.

    Everton were traditionally the irish team in liverpool as they had much more irish internationals than Liverpool.

    Honest John mckenna was a unionist and signed the Ulster covenant in 1912. He wouldnt have seen himself as Irish.

    http://www.orangenet.org/Issue125.pdf

    Any connection Liverpool has with Ireland seems to be no greater to loads of club in the UK. Isnt it about time Irish people start admitting they are glory hunters? Man utd and Liverpool fans everywhere in Ireland simply because they win so much.
    Last edited by Chelsea2scum1; 17-7-11 at 19:37.
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  4. #34  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulmccc View Post
    Liverpool had no real southern irish connection till the 1970s. When we started winning.

    To link Liverpool to Ireland via this song is quite far fetched.

    Everton were traditionally the irish team in liverpool as they had much more irish internationals than Liverpool.

    Honest John mckenna was a unionist and signed the Ulster covenant in 1912. He wouldnt have seen himself as Irish.

    http://www.orangenet.org/Issue125.pdf

    Any connection Liverpool has with Ireland seems to be no greater to loads of club in the UK. Isnt it about time Irish people start admitting they are glory hunters? Man utd and Liverpool fans everywhere in Ireland simply because they win so much
    .

    i disagree with you over this point. liverpool and manchester have a greater irish fan base than other clubs not because of flory hunters but these were the two citys the majority of irish immigrants settled in. if you go to either city you will find most people have a irish background ( myself included)
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarsPirate View Post
    i disagree with you over this point. liverpool and manchester have a greater irish fan base than other clubs not because of flory hunters but these were the two citys the majority of irish immigrants settled in. if you go to either city you will find most people have a irish background ( myself included)
    Fair point MarsPirate but why then do so many support Liverpool and United as opposed to Everton and city?

    Mainly because they are glory hunters. Its only natural as they won the most.

    I would say that in liverpool itself people of irish decent support either club in roughly equal numbers. In Ireland Liverpool fans outnumber everton fans 10:1 easily. probably way more.
    Last edited by Chelsea2scum1; 17-7-11 at 19:55.
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    Great post. I actually watched that documentary only last night on irish TV as it was aired again having been shown originally over a year ago.
    It talks about the sporting links with the song and the teams that have taken the song as a kind of a sporting anthem.
    Just a bit of background. I actually come from a village about ten miles from the town of athenry in county galway. When i was old enough to 'go out' for the first time (late 1990's), a rock version of the song by an artist called Brush shields used to be played in the local nite-club. It came to the stage that people became sick of the song. A bit like another well known song by the name of 'Galway Girl' which was completely overdone around these parts.
    We had all been taught the history of the song in primary school as part of our learning about the Great Famine. As a teacher myself i use it when teaching the same topic today. It's very easy to learn, tells a story and has a good chorus which makes it a very good song for children to memorise.
    It was only in later years that the song took on a whole new meaning for me and indeed for many galway/irish people.Most Irish football supporters would hold glasgow celtic very close to their hearts. they would be their first club, or their second club behind an EPL team. The fields of Athenry for years has been an Anthem sung in Celtic Park. It really came to prominence for me during celtics great years in Europe under martin O'neill in the early 'Noughties'. as a galway person in particular it would make the hair stand on end to hear a local song being sung all over europe.
    As a rugby anthem, the song has probably taken on an even greater significance. the last few years have been the glory years for Irish rugby, at provincial and at international level. The Munster rugby team have adopted the song, even though we in Connaught will want it back as we are in Heineken cup for the first time this season!!!
    The standout rendition of the song from a rugby point of view was the day England rugby team came to Croke park for the first time in 2007. I won't go into the details of it, but there was a huge historcal significance to this. see - http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...re-436869.html
    a historic day, when much was made prior to the game about the singing of the national anthems. They need not have worried. However, there was, once again, one of those spine tingling moments when the croke park stadium heaved to the sound of the Fields of Athenry. You could almost sense the Irish team lifting themselves every time they heard it.
    Sorry to be waffling on, but I'll finish on this. I spoke abot celtic, I spoke about Irish Rugby. But, when I heard The fields of Athenry, or as it turned out, 'the Fields of Anfield Road, being sung at my beloved Anfield, i honestly felt a lump in my throat. It just makes me feel that little bit closer to the club i love even though i live many miles away and don't get to attend Anfield nearly as often as i would like. Sometimes when well known songs are adapted they can be trashy and distasteful, but this is certainly not the case. In fact the original writer of the song Pete St John gave his personal seal of approval to the fields of anfield road and according to the documentary he was honoured it was being used to commemorate the 96 victims of the hillsborough disaster.
    The songs means so much to me as a galway man, an Irish man and needless to say as a liverpool supporter. As anthems go it's up there with the best of them.
    YNWA
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulCromwell View Post
    Fair point MarsPirate but why then do so many support Liverpool and United as opposed to Everton and city?

    Mainly because they are glory hunters. Its only natural as they won the most.

    I would say that in liverpool itself people of irish decent support either club in roughly equal numbers. In Ireland Liverpool fans outnumber everton fans 10:1 easily. probably way more.
    While i would agree that some irish fans are glory hunters, judging by the amount of kids wearing city, chelsea and even spurs jerseys nowadays, as well as liverpool, arsenal and Man Utd, what does it matter? The amount of money that Irish 'Glory hunters' provide for these clubs is huge. Buying merchandise, attending games etc. Why criticise? A lot of suppoters my age (late 20's) and older would have supported clubs because their father/uncle or somebody like that would have supported the club before them. I for one started supporting Liverpool because my uncle who i looked up to as a child was a liverpool fanatic. If he'd have supported dagenham and redbridge i'd be probably supporting them. I'm not ashamed of that. We have to start somewhere. we in ireland don't have the benefit of a strong competitive league over here. In fact where i come from soccer is hardly played at all. It struggles to compete with gaelic games which are huge. football only succeeds in urban areas mostly. We identify with the EPL because of tv coverage and because the majority of irish internationals ply their trade across the water. Don't knock us because we have a very different set of circumstances. The overseas supporters are becoming vital for the financila survival of the premier league club, Thus why all bar one have gone on pre-season tours abroad.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarsPirate View Post
    i disagree with you over this point. liverpool and manchester have a greater irish fan base than other clubs not because of flory hunters but these were the two citys the majority of irish immigrants settled in. if you go to either city you will find most people have a irish background ( myself included)
    i was in Belfast getting my visa last week and i was actually thinking " i've never seen so many Everton fans" Was loads walking about in the filthy strip.
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    Quote Originally Posted by StiflerLFC View Post
    i was in Belfast getting my visa last week and i was actually thinking " i've never seen so many Everton fans" Was loads walking about in the filthy strip.
    They were probably Rangers shirts you seen there mate, after all there's only ONE born every minute like

    @ phatnek, I watched that program mate, and I really enjoyed it, had a bit of a giggle when they showed the clip of the 89 FA cup final when most of the scousers declined to sing God save the Queen and dare I say Booed it instead
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  10. #40  
    tweepie is offline LFC Forums Moderator
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    It was so nice to hear Fields of Athenry being sung by the Irish fans against Spain the other night, and again tonight against Italy it's already being belted out.
    Again, even when you're down and out, still have hope and support.
    YNWA
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  11. #41  
    Paullfc1976 is offline LFC Hall of Fame Resident
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    I love Fields of Anfield road, that being sung by the Kop or our away support in full volume sounds boss.
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  12. #42  
    *Wolfy* is online now The boy that cried sniperwolf!
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    More than life and death, as does everything associated to LFC.
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    The second verse always gets me
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  14. #44  
    tweepie is offline LFC Forums Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by SweetSilverSeven View Post
    The second verse always gets me
    Of the Athenry version? I'd agree with you SSS. It's the point where you know it's not just a matter of him stealing some food to feed his family but he had strong beliefs that led him to rebel and now he's going to leave her and their child behind. (You must raise our child with dignity)
    YNWA
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  15. #45  
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    Liverpool = The capital of Ireland.

    One of the only places the irish were accepted, me included.

    Lets see a massive tri colour up in the kop with the liverbird in the middle.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chelsea2scum1 View Post
    Liverpool had no real southern irish connection till the 1970s. When we started winning.

    To link Liverpool to Ireland via this song is quite far fetched.

    Everton were traditionally the irish team in liverpool as they had much more irish internationals than Liverpool.

    Honest John mckenna was a unionist and signed the Ulster covenant in 1912. He wouldnt have seen himself as Irish.

    http://www.orangenet.org/Issue125.pdf

    Any connection Liverpool has with Ireland seems to be no greater to loads of club in the UK. Isnt it about time Irish people start admitting they are glory hunters? Man utd and Liverpool fans everywhere in Ireland simply because they win so much.
    Firstly I might ask why your username is about Chelsea and Man United when you are (or are supposed to be) a Liverpool fan.

    Secondly, I would like to point out that the majority of people who have even half an interest in the EPL say they follow Manc United. There has never been an accurate survey (and never will be) which can judge how loyal or committed a supporter is, but from my expperience and even from talking to other Irish people, the vast majority of Manc U "fans" couldn't care less about whether they are winning losing or even playing at all. It is easy to say that you "follow" a team, but to actually do it is much a different story.

    If you take a walk around any major Irish city you will see far more Liverpool kits/shirts/jacketsor just merchandise in general than you will of any other team (Manc U included). Now that is one thing that is certain.

    I can't make reference to your point about the 70's as I am too young to remember that not to mention anything before that, but when I started supporting LFC, we had not one a 1st division title or European Cup in recent history - nor did it appear we were any closer to doing so.

    I am obviously not a scouser so I dont know much detail about the % of people with Irish routes in Liverpool but from what we hear and even from what MarsPirate has said, it is widely believed that it is quite a high %.

    It is easy to support a team that are winning or having current/recent success, but to support a club for their history, passion and and great supporters is something that takes much more consideration and commitment. The majority of Manc U or Chelsea fans that I talk to say that they "dont care" when their team loses and it is often you find that they are constantly changing to follow succes (Man City have gained a lot of "supporters" over here recently).

    I would be ashamed to switch my allegiance or even to suggest that LFC's result didnt bother me and even though it may not matter to most it certainly would to me.

    An LFC supporter all my life, and an LFC suporrter I shall remain. Through thick and thin, hold your head up high and YNWA.
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  17. #47  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chelsea2scum1 View Post
    Liverpool had no real southern irish connection till the 1970s. When we started winning.

    Any connection Liverpool has with Ireland seems to be no greater to loads of club in the UK. Isnt it about time Irish people start admitting they are glory hunters? Man utd and Liverpool fans everywhere in Ireland simply because they win so much.
    Heighway, Whelan, Beglin, Aldridge, Houghton, Lawerson, Finnan, Keane, Sheedy, and the fact that about 25% of the city's population was Irish in the 1970s and 80s. I think you'll find that is why we support Liverpool FC. Everton may have been the catholic team historically, but even that fact never made them popular in Ireland. If we were all glory hunters we would have ended our alliegience a long time ago, and they wouldn't still be the best supported team in the country. Liverpool and Ireland have always been linked, - where do you think the recipe for scouse stew came from? But then your a chav, so what would you know?
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    Quote Originally Posted by CorkDork View Post
    Heighway, Whelan, Beglin, Aldridge, Houghton, Lawerson, Finnan, Keane, Sheedy, and the fact that about 25% of the city's population was Irish in the 1970s and 80s. I think you'll find that is why we support Liverpool FC. Everton may have been the catholic team historically, but even that fact never made them popular in Ireland. If we were all glory hunters we would have ended our alliegience a long time ago, and they wouldn't still be the best supported team in the country. Liverpool and Ireland have always been linked, - where do you think the recipe for scouse stew came from? But then your a chav, so what would you know?
    Well said, YNWA!
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    Quote Originally Posted by CorkDork View Post
    Heighway, Whelan, Beglin, Aldridge, Houghton, Lawerson, Finnan, Keane, Sheedy, and the fact that about 25% of the city's population was Irish in the 1970s and 80s. I think you'll find that is why we support Liverpool FC. Everton may have been the catholic team historically, but even that fact never made them popular in Ireland. If we were all glory hunters we would have ended our alliegience a long time ago, and they wouldn't still be the best supported team in the country. Liverpool and Ireland have always been linked, - where do you think the recipe for scouse stew came from? But then your a chav, so what would you know?
    So what? Every team in England has had loads of Irish players. It only happened for Liverpool post the 70s. I

    Why dont Irish people follow the lesser teams in big numbers. Same for all the other non scouse fans all over the world. United/Liverpool are by far the most popular english teams because of their success.
    Last edited by ManeBoBane; 7-10-12 at 21:14.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tweepie View Post
    07/03/11:
    For a while I've been looking into the Irish connection to Liverpool for my next History and Football installment and the topic of the Fields of Anfield Road/Fields of Athenry cropped up in a thread in FD. Unfortunately it got locked due to the behaviour of some posters but I thought I'd make a thread out of the two posts I made in there.

    The timing couldn't be better. The entire crowd was in full voice singing that song at the match yesterday. I was listening to the game on the radio as I was driving at the time. It simply gave me goosebumps. Due to the Irish connection to Liverpool, there is no better club to adapt the original 'Fields of Athenry' as a club anthem.

    So what does 'The Fields of Anfield Road' or indeed (especially if you're Irish) its original version 'The Fields of Athenry' mean to you? Here's what I had to say:

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I love both songs.

    For those of you not familiar with the original:

    "By a lonely prison wall, I heard a young girl calling,
    Michael they are taking you away.
    For you stole Trevelyn's corn,
    So the young might see the morn.
    Now a prison ship lies waiting in the bay.


    Michael and Mary, two young lovers with a child who are torn apart by poverty and the famine. During the famine of the 1840's an effort was made by the British Government was made to import cheap Indian* maize from America in an effort to feed the millions of people who were literally starving to death due to the failure of their staple crop, the potato, to the blight. This corn was nicknamed 'Peel's Brimstone' by the Irish, named after Prime Minister Robert Peel due in part to it's bright yellow colour, due in part to the fact it was hard and difficult to digest (causing diarrhoea). He had tried to repeal Britain's Corn Laws (which protected wealthy British Farmers by imposing high tarrifs on imported grain, making foreign grain too expensive for the Irish farmers) in 1845 but had fierce oppostion by English gentry and politicians. He secretly ordered the import of the cheap Indian meal in 1846 without the knowledge of his conservative ministers to help feed the starving Irish. The Civil servant who was responsible for distributing the corn and overseeing relief operations was Charles Trevelyan (hence Trevelyan's corn). He was overly bureaucratic and non too fond of the Irish either. He claimed that the famine was "mechanism for reducing surplus population" and "The judgement of God sent the calamity to teach the Irish a lesson, that calamity must not be too much mitigated. …The real evil with which we have to contend is not the physical evil of the Famine, but the moral evil of the selfish, perverse and turbulent character of the people". (Incidently, it's quotes like this that lead some Irish to describe the Famine as the Irish Holocaust as they believe the British government deliberatly did nothing to help the Irish so that they would be eradicated as a population)
    Trevelyan only once visited Ireland, and that was to Dublin (where the impact of the famine wasn't as severe). He implemented 'public works' programmes to provide employment (at a pittance) to the Irish so that they could afford the 'one penny per pound' corn. Even this was not enough to sustain the hungry who were used to surviving on 14 pounds of potatoes a day. (A monotonous, yet healthy diet). Plus the corn needed to be ground twice before it was fit for consumption and Ireland had very few mills that could process this grain. There was also insubstansial supplies to feed the hungry and as supplies ran out.... more desperate people turned to crime in an effort to steal the corn 'so the young might see the morn'
    As a result, Michael in the song... and many others like him were bound for the prision ship and the penal colonies of Australia.

    *Indian, meaning native American.

    By a lonely prison wall
    I heard a young man calling
    Nothing matters Mary when you're free,
    Against the Famine and the Crown
    I rebelled they ran me down
    Now you must raise our child with dignity.


    In this verse Michael, hearing Mary's cries replies to her. It also gives another side to the story of the famine. That of the rebel fenians (or Young Irelanders)
    In 1848, rebellions and social uprisings were happening throughout Europe, and Ireland was no different. A group calling themselves the Irish Confederate called for an Irish Parliament (having been abolished in 1801) that would have full legislative powers in Ireland. They did not advocate full rebellion but neither did they say they would use exclusively peaceful means. Their goal was independence of the Irish nation and they held to any means to achieve that which were consistent with honour, morality and reason. They became known as the 'Young Irelanders'. Led by William Smith O'Brien and Thomas Meagher (names largely forgotten in Irish republican history) they believed they could achieve a bloodless rebellion through the united efforts of Irish landlords and tenants. (Irish landlords also 'suffered' as a result of the famine as many tenants were unable to pay rents so very often they paid for their passage to England or America). The British government however declared a suspension of 'Habeas Corpus' meaning they could arrest and imprision the Young Irelanders without trial. Smith O'Brien and others decided to resist and fight. The main revolt took place in the village of Ballingarry in Co. Tipperary. A stand-off occured in a farmhouse where the police then fired unprovoked at the rebels. This led to an exchange of shots and subsequently the rebel leaders were arrested. They were initially charged and found guilty of treason and sentenced to death but this was commuted and the were to be transported to the penal colonies in Australia and Tasmania.
    Given that Michael says that 'against the famine and the crown I rebelled' and that the 'prision ship' is waiting to transport him to the colony, another interpretation is that he was perhaps involved with the fenians and young Irelanders, even though Athenry is in Galway and not Tipperary. For Mary; She's left holding the baby.

    By a lonely harbour wall She watched the last star falling
    And that prison ship sailed out against the sky
    Sure she'll wait and hope and pray
    For her love in Botany Bay,
    It's so lonely round the fields of Athenry.


    I feel this is the saddest verse. She is watching her love go to a far off land. It's likely she'll never see him again. Yet the middle line still has a note of optimism, of hope. That she may one day be reunited with him. It almost embodies the Irish spirit. That no matter how bad things are, there is always hope for the future and there are always the happy memories of the past. This is echoed I feel, in the chorus:

    Low, lie the fields of Athenry,
    Where once we watched the small free birds fly
    Our love was on the wing,
    We had dreams and songs to sing

    It's so lonely round the fields of Athenry.


    For a fleeting moment it harks back to a simpler more innocent time, when they were were in love and had dreams for the future. Ultimately it's a sad song, but it has a strong sense of resiliance and of hope. To never give up no matter how bad things get. It's this message too that really serves as a connection to the adapted version that we all like to sing in Anfield.
    (and really relates to the club)

    That to follow....
    Thanks so much for all this explanation, it is very interesting.
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  21. #51  
    tweepie is offline LFC Forums Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerrrardo57 View Post
    Thanks so much for all this explanation, it is very interesting.
    I wrote it over 18 months ago, I'm glad people still read and like it.
    YNWA
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  22. #52  
    JurgenBelieveUs is online now Academy prospect
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    Lovely read, thanks. Don't have too much Irish blood but I find the original brilliant as well.
    Last edited by JurgenBelieveUs; 20-2-13 at 00:41.
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    LOBGA is offline Armchair supporter
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    hmmmn...very emotional but the song always got me GOOSE-PIMPLES and a HULK-like feeling....koppite I would forever be...YWNWA
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    When I first heard Athenry (in a pub in Gory) the last line of the second verse ended "You must raise our child with liberty". Not a major change but significant in Ireland.
    I know many folk songs have different versions and word changes (Salford City Council went spare due to the original reference to them in "Dirty Old Town"), but I think the "liberty" version more accurately represents the emotion of the song.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jojowasaman View Post
    Liverpool = The capital of Ireland.

    One of the only places the irish were accepted, me included.

    Lets see a massive tri colour up in the kop with the liverbird in the middle.
    Liverpool is not the capital of Ireland no matter what you think,....... though the Fields of Anfield Road is a beautiful song well composed and very historical regarding our 2 most successful ever managers please don't make this song a political hot potato regarding having a massive tricolour on the Kop whether it has a liverbird in the middle or not. Surely we don't want our club to deemed to be sharing any connection with either of the 2 tribes in Ireland north or south. Keep this nonsense out of football.
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    Quote Originally Posted by waltonbrecker View Post
    Liverpool is not the capital of Ireland no matter what you think,....... though the Fields of Anfield Road is a beautiful song well composed and very historical regarding our 2 most successful ever managers please don't make this song a political hot potato regarding having a massive tricolour on the Kop whether it has a liverbird in the middle or not. Surely we don't want our club to deemed to be sharing any connection with either of the 2 tribes in Ireland north or south. Keep this nonsense out of football.
    This ... a thousand times over.
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    redalzer is offline Armchair supporter
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    As the son of a Welsh man and an Irish woman who met while at college in Liverpool, there was no choice in my family when it came to which team you were going to support. My father supported Liverpool religiously while he lived there (through good times and bad!!!) and we have made the trip to Anfield regularly despite growing up in Ireland. My brother bowed to peer pressure when he was 8 and proclaimed that he was switching allegiance to the Mancs for almost a month and 30 years later we still never let him forget it, the fair-weather supporter that he is :FP: Football support is a "tribal" thing and just cos I don't live in sight of Anfield doesn't make me any less passionate.

    As for "The Fields of Athenry/Anfield Road", I loved the original song even before I knew it as a club anthem and nothing makes me prouder than belting it out in full voice on match day - it gets me every time!!! And while I will admit that there is now an element of the crowd that don't seem to join in, that's an element that can't fail to be stirred by it and motivated to get involved next time!!! Despite it's political origins, the song should never become a political entity on the terraces. I live in Belfast now, so I feel I know a thing or two about political divides and I will do everything in my power to keep politics out of football.

    Now let's stay unbeaten until the end of the season, particularly around the fields of Anfield Road!!!!!!
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  28. #58  
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    Thanks to the OP for posting. A great read even though i'm familiar with the origins and meaning of Fields of Athenry. Lovely to see it articulated so well though.

    I was watching Reeling in the Years, an Irish tv programme in which each episode relays the events which took place nationally and internationally for a specific year. There is no narrator. Instead music from the year is played as a soundtrack to video footage with minimal subtitles describing events. The episode I was watching was 1983. It featured Thatcher's re-election, industrial unrest in Ireland, the US invasion of Grenada etc.

    An excerpt of Paddy Reilly's version of The Fields of Athenry was played. I was watching tv on my own and welled up as I listened to it. I was embarrassed that i was listening to this song and actually weeping!! I don't know if it was this innate Irish sense of sadness, outrage and defiance about the oppression suffered by the Irish people over centuries of rule by the British establishment. Kind of like being Liverpudlian working class under successive Tory governments (on steroids) I imagine! Anyway it was spontaneous and real.

    The fact that LFC has its own version is something I am so proud of too. A beautiful song (even though it wouldn't be my kind of music normally).

    I'm hitting my mid 40s now and have supported Liverpool since 1983 when Ronnie Whelan scored the winner v ManUtd in the League Cup Final. I was a child, perhaps I was glory hunting by following Liverpool but Ronnie Whelan was my hero, is Irish and he played for Liverpool, the best team in England. Why should I be ashamed for tapping into the pride I felt having any sort of connection to that success? If I was a glory hunter then, i'm certainly not one now as I would simply have lost interest in LFC given the length of time that's passed since we last achieved league glory.

    My son is 13 and an avid LFC supporter and I've told him he's a better fan than me because he's never really seen LFC achieve success and when it does come along it will be so much sweeter for him than it is for his Man United, Chelsea or Man City supporting pals (although he has a few LFC pals too). No one can ever accuse him of being a glory hunter by following Liverpool given the other clubs he could have chosen to support and the success they've achieved throughout his entire childhood.

    I do feel a strong connection to the city of Liverpool. I believe the people of Liverpool are more like Irish people in humour and outlook than anywhere else i've ever been to or heard of.

    I'm proud to be associated with LFC and its links to Ireland and will continue to support MY club for as long as I live.

    YNWA
    You're not as stupid as you look, or sound, or our best testing indicates.
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  29. #59  
    tweepie is offline LFC Forums Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by beatlesmith View Post
    Thanks to the OP for posting. A great read even though i'm familiar with the origins and meaning of Fields of Athenry. Lovely to see it articulated so well though.
    Thank You for your comments. I'm glad you enjoyed reading it.
    I can't believe it's over 5 years since
    I wrote this! Where has the time gone!

    Back then, Kenny had returned as manager and we'd just signed Suarez.

    Ronnie Whelan was also my favourite player when I was younger, it was his goal vs USSR in Euro 88 that did it. I'm in my late 30s so like you it's been many years since I last saw us lift the league trophy (I was only a child) but while 'glory' has been short on supply in the intervening years we've still seen fantastic moments. I myself was lucky enough to be in ?The Ataturk in 2005 and I saw a few of our home games in the 13/14 title challenge season.. (Incl Man City).
    I hope to witness great things again this season.
    YNWA
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  30. #60  
    Socratease is offline LFC Forums Moderator
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    Good post Boston.


    ,
    The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance. Socrates.
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