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Thread: Depression and its effects, a discussion thread

  1. #61  
    geralion is offline Or a tiger they're almost as good
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paullfc1976 View Post
    Sorry, mate.

    Despite you going to all this effort, this is complete and utter tripe.

    You should try to be less insensitive.
    Really? You might be less offensive to my opinion.
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  2. #62  
    Liverdinner is offline Posts With His Faace
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    Quote Originally Posted by Locutus View Post
    I imagine it's different for everyone. I had a friend who withdrew to her room and was 'unreachable' by other humans, when she became acute.
    I've no idea what was going around in her head, she wouldn't say.
    Yeah I'd like some insight from somebody into what goes around in the head of a depressed person.
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  3. #63  
    Liverpoolforme is online now First team regular
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    I think that's a very good point, people have different methods that work for them!

    And I guess it will also depends on the level of depression people have.

    Exercise is something doctors are prescribing more and more due to the endorphins that are released when exercising which gives your body and mind a positive feeling, and the increased level of self esteem it can give you.

    I imagine this alone would not be enough for the more severe cases, but it certainly would help!
    Last edited by Liverpoolforme; 14-8-14 at 15:49.
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  4. #64  
    geralion is offline Or a tiger they're almost as good
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    Quote Originally Posted by redhoops View Post
    Wont lie , still have a drink but its controlled, days off or actual nights out. I could count on one hand the days per year i never drank a few years ago. Hell , one finger. It took me too long and cost me too many great girlfriends to realise the issues that drove me to hit the bottle werent going to be flushed away by its contents .

    Have no idea if i was actually suffering from depression , didnt see a doctor , but i was in a bad place for many years . Drinking made it a harder place to leave.
    Good for you. My ex husband was cross addicted to alcohol and cocaine - a terrible mix. It was awful watching someone ruin themselves when the solution was so simple. He did full on rehab and many years later he can now enjoy a drink without it taking over. He became a therapist and counsellor for addicts for a while but realised how much self sabotage people are subject to and that they can change. So he did! You'll be fine - it sounds like you've faced yourself.
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  5. #65  
    geralion is offline Or a tiger they're almost as good
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liverpoolforme View Post
    I think that's a very good point, people have different methods that work for them!

    And I guess it will also depend on the level of depression people have.

    Exercise is something doctors are prescribing more and more due to the endorphins that are released when exercising which gives your body and mind a positive feeling, and the increased level of self esteem it can give you.

    I imagine this alone would not be alone for the more severe cases, but it certainly would help!
    Agreed.
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  6. #66  
    geralion is offline Or a tiger they're almost as good
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookygarcia View Post
    Oh my. :FP:

    I was 16 a very long time ago. You failed to mention the ''eight years later'' part.

    Your analysis is irrelevant, as well as a joke in terms of factual content.

    Goodnight Seattle.
    Here's the readable version for you of studies into teenage brain development - you said you attempted suicide aged 16?

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontl...ain/view/#rest

    And here is one of many scholarly articles - so if you think its a joke in factual terms - take it up with those who have done the studies - I'm sure they'd love your input. And when you've read it there are lots more.

    http://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar_...=0CCAQgAMoATAA
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  7. #67  
    kickthetyres is online now LFC Forums Moderator
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    Thanks guys. One thing I have noticed since this happened is the extent to which people try to cover up their feelings but also how noticeable the signs are that something is not right if you switch on to people as people and not just objects, if that makes sense. A work colleague of mine is desperately unhappy in his job but is also caught in the trap of modern day life where he needs the income to pay his mortgage and bills. He has changed from an effervescent individual who was always around interacting with everyone, to a virtual recluse who hides himself away in a room on his own and just gets on with things so he doesn't have to speak to our line manager who is probably the most useless, stupid person on planet earth to be in a position of such responsibility. He certainly can't see, or doesn't care about, the obvious change in behaviour of my colleague and this is difficult as he is the cause of much of it.
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  8. #68  
    cookygarcia is offline LFC Forums Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by kickthetyres View Post
    2 years ago my brother committed suicide, in his flat, alone where he lived having separated from his wife. Adding everything up that was going on in his life - living alone after a happy marriage, his two autistic and AS spectrum sons who are unlikely to ever lead what society would refer to as a 'normal' life and his job that saw him living out of a suitcase in hotels here there and everywhere because nobody else in the office would do it - its now obvious he was suffering from depression. Yet I never suspected, and its torture to think that just a few words when he was in the country may have helped. The last I heard from him was a text saying 'Happy Birthday from Toronto', a few days later he was gone
    This wretched illness should never simply be dismissed and the sufferer told to 'man up' or whatever.
    So sorry to hear this, my friend.
    Sangria FTW.
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  9. #69  
    kickthetyres is online now LFC Forums Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by geralion View Post
    This is nothing to do with manning up and I don't know who advocates that.
    Oh I do. It comes from the 'stuff upper lip and all that' side to the British character that many people of the generation and background I work with, tend to exhibit.

    A few years back a lad who worked for me got himself into some pretty serious trouble that resulted in a police investigation and ultimate dismissal from his job. Whilst the investigation was ongoing he was put under medication and completely lost focus on what he was supposed to be doing to the extent that he had to be put on work where he couldn't endanger himself or anyone working with him. The complete lack of any sympathy shown by some of the workforce was quite disgusting in my view, and I had to put up with a lot of stick whilst trying to keep this lad out of harms way.

    On reflection, I've worked with work with some utter dicks
    Last edited by kickthetyres; 14-8-14 at 16:20.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kickthetyres View Post
    Oh I do. It comes from the 'stuff upper lip and all that' side to the British character that many people of the generation and background I work with, tend to exhibit.
    It's no wonder the suicide rate for men is three and a half times that of women.
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  11. #71  
    cookygarcia is offline LFC Forums Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by phuzz View Post
    It's no wonder the suicide rate for men is three and a half times that of women.
    In my own family's ancestry, suicide has been far more frequent among women than men. However, my lot are a weird bunch (not meant in a flippant way; this is very obviously not a flippant topic.)
    Sangria FTW.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookygarcia View Post
    *deep breath*

    This is the sort of tripe that was spouted at me when I was younger, and listening to such nonsense for too long was nearly the end of me, in all honesty. I refused to take medication that I needed, in order for my brain to function as it should do, for about eight years after I attempted suicide at 16. Why didn't I have the sense to take the pills that would help me? Mainly because I was surrounded by people telling me that depression wasn't an ''illness'', but merely a state of mind. They were spouting horse manure.

    I was unwell. I refused to accept this fact, and thought I could ''shut up and get on with it'', ''pull myself together'', blah blah blah, because that's the sort of environment I was brought up in. Guess what? No matter how much I focused on my A-levels/my degree/my job/my long term relationship, depending on which stage of life I was at, my chronic insomnia and subconscious issues increased in intensity. until I could barely function. That was when I finally accepted that I had an illness, and that it wasn't down to me being ''weak'' - I had spent years attempting to force myself to carry on pretending nothing was wrong.

    We can all act like Linford Christie in the old Lucozade adverts, shouting ''POSITIVE MENTAL ATTITUDE'' (showing my age here), and of course it helps to have determination, etc. That's not the point.

    The point is that the brain is an organ, which can malfunction like any other. I can't imagine anybody being daft enough to tell someone with diabetes or renal problems that their problem is a ''state which (one) has sovereignity over''. If you are depressed, your brain is not producing enough serotonin. Your brain is therefore not functioning as it should be. Sweet words about ''positive thinking'' are all very well, but they don't solve the problem of the ILLNESS.

    I apologise to everyone here if it seems that I've made this ''all about me'' - that was really not my intention. I just didn't know how else to attempt to explain it without referencing my own personal experience. I hope it did not appear self-indulgent.
    Not in the slightest bit self indulgent .. in fact, quite the opposite - especially your first two paragraphs which illustrate the core of the problems faced by someone with depression, starting with denial (and I would say that the denial tends to be societal in nature). And your point alluding to chemical imbalance is very well made.

    After my son was born, my wife was admitted to hospital suffering from severe post natal depression. I knew something was wrong when little one was 4 weeks old but only realised the severity when she woke me at 3AM on the morning she was admitted to hospital, informing me in the most chilling manner that the future would proceed in one of the 3 following ways: Either she would be leaving and not coming back, or she would kill herself, or she would kill our baby.

    Once she had been diagnosed with PND, the hard work began .. as PND is a condition which IS CAUSED DIRECTLY BY A CHEMICAL IMBALANCE IN THE BRAIN (as cookie has said, and this applies to the vast majority of depressive conditions), she was immediately put onto a course of SSRI's (drugs which manage serotonin levels), and underwent intensive psychotherapy. Cutting a very long story short, she continued with this treatment for 3 years - during that time, she underwent a personality change, from being outgoing and friendly to being completely withdrawn and 'neutral' (the only way I can explain it) .. as she herself described it - no ups and downs, just day to day monotony (this sounds quite negative but it was actually a blessing, considering how suicidal and totally down she had been prior to this). After the 3 years, she was slowly weaned off the medication, and is now back to being completely full of ***** and the woman I fell in love with (it is now nearly 4 years since she came off the meds and stopped all treatment and our little boy turned 7 yesterday - one aside from this is that he unfortunately picked up on her anxiety as a small baby, developed a condition himself, and he himself is now on anti-anxiety medication - interesting how this developed and why it required meds, but that is another story).

    Had she not woken me up at 3AM that morning and shared her feelings with me, I do not like to think of what might have happened. Thank the powers that be she did - and that she overcame her disease.

    This is one story of millions .. about only one form of depression - it is, as I said in an earlier post, an insidious disease that can affect anyone .. if you want to get an inkling of what it feels like, try imagining a life where you have little to no interest in things that surround you, you have little to no energy, nothing seems to give you pleasure and you feel sad most of the time. Add to that bad sleep patterns, low self confidence and regular feelings of guilt and suicide and you start to get an idea of what depression is. All of us will experience feelings of being down and depressed in our lives but, fortunately, these feelings are transient .. the chronically depressed person will feel these feelings most of the time, and they just do not leave without some form of treatment.

    Never, ever look down on someone who has this disease - they need the same level of care, love and (perhaps most importantly of all) support that anyone with a more 'acceptable' (can't think of a better way to describe it) form of condition does. They are already operating from a position where they have desperate issues to contend with - demeaning and trivializing them and their disease will only compound that.
    Last edited by grenny158; 14-8-14 at 16:40.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kickthetyres View Post
    2 years ago my brother committed suicide, in his flat, alone where he lived having separated from his wife. Adding everything up that was going on in his life - living alone after a happy marriage, his two autistic and AS spectrum sons who are unlikely to ever lead what society would refer to as a 'normal' life and his job that saw him living out of a suitcase in hotels here there and everywhere because nobody else in the office would do it - its now obvious he was suffering from depression. Yet I never suspected, and its torture to think that just a few words when he was in the country may have helped. The last I heard from him was a text saying 'Happy Birthday from Toronto', a few days later he was gone
    This wretched illness should never simply be dismissed and the sufferer told to 'man up' or whatever.
    So hard, kickthetyres, so hard. Condolences to you.
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    I have depression and all I can say at this point in time is that I hate depression and it hates me as I intend on fighting on through it.
    If you haven't got your mind you have nothing!
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  15. #75  
    kickthetyres is online now LFC Forums Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by grenny158 View Post
    So hard, kickthetyres, so hard. Condolences to you.
    Thanks grenny and Cooky. Glad to hear you and your wife got through it. Mine suffered to a certain extent when I was in the forces living in Cyprus and ended up on anti-depressants, she got terribly homesick and hated being totally dependent on me. I couldn't understand it as I was having the time of my life with the sun, sea and kebabs. But it did change when she got herself a job and a small group of friends, unfortunately I never learned from that, although I definitely have now.

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveDream
    I have depression and all I can say at this point in time is that I hate depression and it hates me as I intend on fighting on through it.
    If you haven't got your mind you have nothing.
    Keep strong mate, and you beat it OK?
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveDream View Post
    I have depression and all I can say at this point in time is that I hate depression and it hates me as I intend on fighting on through it.
    If you haven't got your mind you have nothing!
    There is definitely light at the end of the tunnel, Dave .. keep fighting the good fight! I hope you are receiving the necessary counseling or therapy and not battling through it alone.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kickthetyres View Post
    Thanks grenny and Cooky. Glad to hear you and your wife got through it. Mine suffered to a certain extent when I was in the forces living in Cyprus and ended up on anti-depressants, she got terribly homesick and hated being totally dependent on me. I couldn't understand it as I was having the time of my life with the sun, sea and kebabs. But it did change when she got herself a job and a small group of friends, unfortunately I never learned from that, although I definitely have now.



    Keep strong mate, and you beat it OK?
    I can relate to that .. I initially found it difficult to understand my wife's condition, and it took a lot of research to get to the point where I could be of assistance to her.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kickthetyres View Post
    2 years ago my brother committed suicide, in his flat, alone where he lived having separated from his wife. Adding everything up that was going on in his life - living alone after a happy marriage, his two autistic and AS spectrum sons who are unlikely to ever lead what society would refer to as a 'normal' life and his job that saw him living out of a suitcase in hotels here there and everywhere because nobody else in the office would do it - its now obvious he was suffering from depression. Yet I never suspected, and its torture to think that just a few words when he was in the country may have helped. The last I heard from him was a text saying 'Happy Birthday from Toronto', a few days later he was gone
    This wretched illness should never simply be dismissed and the sufferer told to 'man up' or whatever.
    Just seen this post. Mate thats grim, life is so fragile . Hope you and your family are coping .
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    Quote Originally Posted by kickthetyres View Post
    2 years ago my brother committed suicide, in his flat, alone where he lived having separated from his wife. Adding everything up that was going on in his life - living alone after a happy marriage, his two autistic and AS spectrum sons who are unlikely to ever lead what society would refer to as a 'normal' life and his job that saw him living out of a suitcase in hotels here there and everywhere because nobody else in the office would do it - its now obvious he was suffering from depression. Yet I never suspected, and its torture to think that just a few words when he was in the country may have helped. The last I heard from him was a text saying 'Happy Birthday from Toronto', a few days later he was gone
    This wretched illness should never simply be dismissed and the sufferer told to 'man up' or whatever.
    This was hard to read, I'm so sorry mate.

    I have had it most of my life but I ignored it, that didn't work out to well.
    I tried over the years to explain how I was feeling to family but they didn't take it serious and in the end I had enough and didn't have contact with any of them for over two years. The contact started up again not so long back due to myself getting so low I was about to take my own life but something made me call an ambulance, since then my family have been great and very helpful since seeing what a mess I was in. The build up to me going hospital I hadn't eat or slept at all for about a week maybe more, so obviously I didn't look to good. I guess that helped in a way because my loved ones know how serious it is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveDream View Post
    This was hard to read, I'm so sorry mate.

    I have had it most of my life but I ignored it, that didn't work out to well.
    I tried over the years to explain how I was feeling to family but they didn't take it serious and in the end I had enough and didn't have contact with any of them for over two years. The contact started up again not so long back due to myself getting so low I was about to take my own life but something made me call an ambulance, since then my family have been great and very helpful since seeing what a mess I was in. The build up to me going hospital I hadn't eat or slept at all for about a week maybe more, so obviously I didn't look to good. I guess that helped in a way because my loved ones know how serious it is.
    So pleased you are getting the support you need and deserve, Dave .. All strength to you.
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    Quote Originally Posted by grenny158 View Post
    So pleased you are getting the support you need and deserve, Dave .. All strength to you.
    Cheers grenny appreciate it, I hope one day people understand depression for the horrible illness it is so more stand a better chance of getting better or at least managing it better.
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    TheRiedle is online now First team regular
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    Been through depression due personal family problems in the past, it's probably the hardest thing I've had to deal with in my lifetime. I didn't go to my GP or anything though just learnt to cope with it. I'd just like to add stress is another misunderstood disease.
    ?
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    Just to give an indication of how 'chemical imbalance' can affect mood and depression: For a few weeks now I have been feeling physically exhausted and mentally drained and down, and irritable a lot of the time. Very unusual for me so I went to the doc and had a barrage of blood tests done. Turns out I have an iron deficiency - I have been on an iron supplement for a week now, and I feel infinitely better already (even though the doc said I should expect to see results in only 10 days to 2 weeks) .. this highlights two things for me:

    1. I thought I was just being lazy physically and 'full of ****' mentally and that I needed to snap out of it. No amount of coaxing myself 'in my mind' could accomplish that though - and believe me when I say I am usually a VERY positive person,and I rarely, if ever, have issues motivating myself.
    2. A chemical, or even mineral, imbalance in your system is, for the most part, to blame for these kinds of feelings. I was pretty sure that was the case before, but now I am even more convinced (not that I really needed convincing).

    One other point that bears this out - anyone who has been 'naughty' in their lives and taken ecstasy will surely be familiar with the comedown effect a couple of days after your 'party' has ended. This is due to the serotonin levels being depleted and a couple more chemical interactions taking place. No matter how hard you try, it is virtually impossible to control that 'comedown' .. you cannot just 'snap out of it', without a huge amount of self-control, if at all.

    For me, this is additional info which supports the 'chemical imbalance' factor as being the predominant one vis--vis depression.
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  24. #84  
    Liverpoolforme is online now First team regular
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    Quote Originally Posted by grenny158 View Post
    Just to give an indication of how 'chemical imbalance' can affect mood and depression: For a few weeks now I have been feeling physically exhausted and mentally drained and down, and irritable a lot of the time. Very unusual for me so I went to the doc and had a barrage of blood tests done. Turns out I have an iron deficiency - I have been on an iron supplement for a week now, and I feel infinitely better already (even though the doc said I should expect to see results in only 10 days to 2 weeks) .. this highlights two things for me:

    1. I thought I was just being lazy physically and 'full of ****' mentally and that I needed to snap out of it. No amount of coaxing myself 'in my mind' could accomplish that though - and believe me when I say I am usually a VERY positive person,and I rarely, if ever, have issues motivating myself.
    2. A chemical, or even mineral, imbalance in your system is, for the most part, to blame for these kinds of feelings. I was pretty sure that was the case before, but now I am even more convinced (not that I really needed convincing).

    One other point that bears this out - anyone who has been 'naughty' in their lives and taken ecstasy will surely be familiar with the comedown effect a couple of days after your 'party' has ended. This is due to the serotonin levels being depleted and a couple more chemical interactions taking place. No matter how hard you try, it is virtually impossible to control that 'comedown' .. you cannot just 'snap out of it', without a huge amount of self-control, if at all.

    For me, this is additional info which supports the 'chemical imbalance' factor as being the predominant one vis--vis depression.
    Very enlightening post, glad you are feeling better!
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    Socratease is offline LFC Forums Moderator
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    Mental trauma is not a physical disease - it is not an affliction of the body or of the brain per se , though in some cases brain injuries go beyond this which cause mental health problems to be addressed.

    Mental health is assessed upon the ability of cognition and the not so rigorous aspect of the logical and illogical with then the emotional response.

    Depression is not a disease, it isn't catching - you cannot catch depression by breathing it in, it isn't contagious, to label depression as a 'disease' is misleading and in fact denigrating in respect of misrepesenting it as a categorical 'disease'.


    Mental health considerations are expansive and complicated/diverse, this concerns me that depression and suicide are awkwardly combined as a title of a thread.

    I have reservations, I do understand the question, though clumsy, just a bit.


    Last edited by Socratease; 20-8-14 at 08:59.
    The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance. Socrates.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Socratease View Post
    Mental trauma is not a physical disease - it is not an affliction of the body or of the brain per se , though in some cases brain injuries go beyond this which cause mental health problems to be addressed.

    Mental health is assessed upon the ability of cognition and the not so rigorous aspect of the logical and illogical with then the emotional response.

    Depression is not a disease, it isn't catching - you cannot catch depression by breathing it in, it isn't contagious, to label depression as a 'disease' is misleading and in fact denigrating in respect of misrepesenting it as a catagorical 'disease'.


    Mental health considerations are expansive and complicated/diverse, this concerns me that depression and suicide are awkwardly combined as a title of a thread.

    I have reservations, I do understand the question, though clumbsy, just a bit.


    heart disease isn't contagious, but it is still a disease. Diabetes likewise. With all due respect I disagree with every one of your points.

    disease
    dɪˈziːz/
    noun
    noun: disease; plural noun: diseases; noun: dis-ease; plural noun: dis-eases

    a disorder of structure or function in a human, animal, or plant, especially one that produces specific symptoms or that affects a specific location and is not simply a direct result of physical injury.
    "bacterial meningitis is quite a rare disease"
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    Socratease is offline LFC Forums Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by angelYNWA View Post
    heart disease isn't contagious, but it is still a disease. Diabetes likewise. With all due respect I disagree with every one of your points.

    disease
    dɪˈziːz/
    noun
    noun: disease; plural noun: diseases; noun: dis-ease; plural noun: dis-eases

    a disorder of structure or function in a human, animal, or plant, especially one that produces specific symptoms or that affects a specific location and is not simply a direct result of physical injury.
    "bacterial meningitis is quite a rare disease"
    I acknowledge your point angel, but acknowledge mine with due measure, give me a definable link defining depression as a disease, if it is a disease I was actually contaged personally.


    ,
    The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance. Socrates.
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    Socratease is offline LFC Forums Moderator
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    I do give due deference to some heartfelt posts in this thread, but do regard that depression does not necessarily become incumbent to suicide in regard to mental health.




    ,
    The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance. Socrates.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Socratease View Post
    I do give due deference to some heartfelt posts in this thread, but do regard that depression does not necessarily become incumbent to suicide in regard to mental health.
    Or suicide necessarily to have anything to do with depression.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Socratease View Post
    I acknowledge your point angel, but acknowledge mine with due measure, give me a definable link defining depression as a disease, if it is a disease I was actually contaged personally.


    ,
    well the definition I gave you is from the Oxford English dictionary, so pretty reputable.
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